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Saturday, April 21, 2012

Bill Maher's "Real Time,": Republicans at war with common sense.

Bill Maher's "Real Time,":  Republicans at war with common sense.

Fox News, no war on women?




Lawrence O'Donnell's take on Fox hypocrisy:



PBS releases 'Money, power and Wall Street'


 'Money, power and Wall Street' starting April 29th.


Watch Money, Power and Wall Street on PBS. See more from FRONTLINE.

Saturday, April 14, 2012

The oligarchs strike back, banks to spend big in 2012

Oh yes, the banks are striking back in 2012.  No more sitting on the sidelines, after the American Autumn they worked the legal system passing laws restricting protest, and let's not forget you can be strip search anytime you're detained in the criminal justice system.

Politico:

Big banks might have kept their heads down in 2010, but those days are over. A group of banks launched a super PAC to zero in on key congressional races recently. Earlier this year, financial services groups held a high-profile fundraiser for a candidate challenging a senior Senate Republican. And the industry is remembering its friends on Capitol Hill — shelling out cash to lawmakers who have consistently voted their way.

It’s a PR shift for banks, who lowered their profile after the widely unpopular bank bailout, which served as a rallying cry for the tea party.

But after President Barack Obama signed the Dodd-Frank financial reform bill into law and the Occupy Wall Street movement amplified anti-bank rhetoric that even some Democrats in Congress picked up, it appears the industry has had enough. They’re taking a more vocal stand this cycle, and they’ve shown they’re willing to back up their talk with serious money — a scenario that should make both Democrats and some Republicans nervous heading into the summer campaign season.

“No one likes being kicked around, and there’s definitely that sentiment,” said Scott Talbott, senior vice president for government affairs at the Financial Services Roundtable, which represents the banking industry in addition to other financial interests. The banking industry has always been a major player in political spending, but its increasingly aggressive tactics are a sign that some in the industry want to pack more of a punch on Capitol Hill, particularly with the sweeping overhaul to the financial system still under way and with big legislative reforms on the horizon.

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Rest is here:

Wednesday, April 11, 2012

Kentucky bourbon thriving worldwide

Bourbon thriving worldwide, good news for Kentucky.

 

Obama renews populist pitch on Buffet tax

Visit msnbc.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

Monday, April 9, 2012

Food for thought



Saturday, April 7, 2012

Big surpirse, NRA just puppet of the right

CNN:


NRA expands its role from fight for gun rights to conservative causes


"Less well known is that the NRA has also helped ALEC spread other conservative laws that have nothing to do with gun rights.
ALEC drafts and shares model bills with state legislators to promote corporation-friendly and conservative social policy.
A watchdog group called the Center for Media and Democracy first documented the NRA's role in these bills with ALEC.
An NRA lobbyist, Tara Mica, helped shepherd a model bill that requires voters to show a photo ID at the polls. Many conservatives have pushed voter ID laws to prevent election fraud. Many liberals say these laws inhibit voting by minorities.
Mica also helped preside over ALEC's passage of the model bill that became the basis of Arizona's immigration law. That's the law that requires police to arrest anyone who cannot prove when asked that they entered the United States legally.
The NRA and Mica wouldn't talk with CNN, so it's not known whether Mica consulted with other NRA officials about the bills on voter ID and immigration.
ALEC also declined to answer questions."

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Chomsky: How the Young Are Indoctrinated to Obey

Alternet:

Forty years ago there was deep concern that the population was breaking free of apathy and obedience. Since then, many measures have been taken to restore discipline.



California is also a battleground. The Los Angeles Times reports on another chapter in the campaign to destroy what had been the greatest public higher education system in the world: "California State University officials announced plans to freeze enrollment next spring at most campuses and to wait-list all applicants the following fall pending the outcome of a proposed tax initiative on the November ballot."
Similar defunding is under way nationwide. "In most states," The New York Times reports, "it is now tuition payments, not state appropriations, that cover most of the budget," so that "the era of affordable four-year public universities, heavily subsidized by the state, may be over."
Community colleges increasingly face similar prospects – and the shortfalls extend to grades K-12.
"There has been a shift from the belief that we as a nation benefit from higher education, to a belief that it's the people receiving the education who primarily benefit and so they should foot the bill," concludes Ronald G. Ehrenberg, a trustee of the State University system of New York and director of the Cornell Higher Education Research Institute.
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Michigan begins dismantling unions, universal suffrage





How the US uses sexual humiliation as a political tool to control the masses

The oligarchical master respond to #OWS:

The Guardian:

In a five-four ruling this week, the supreme court decided that anyone can be strip-searched upon arrest for any offense, however minor, at any time. This horror show ruling joins two recent horror show laws: the NDAA, which lets anyone be arrested forever at any time, and HR 347, the "trespass bill", which gives you a 10-year sentence for protestinganywhere near someone with secret service protection. These criminalizations of being human follow, of course, the mini-uprising of the Occupy movement.
Is American strip-searching benign? The man who had brought the initial suit, Albert Florence, described having been told to "turn around. Squat and cough. Spread your cheeks." He said he felt humiliated: "It made me feel like less of a man."
In surreal reasoning, justice Anthony Kennedy explained that this ruling is necessary because the 9/11 bomber could have been stopped for speeding. How would strip searching him have prevented the attack? Did justice Kennedy imagine that plans to blow up the twin towers had been concealed in a body cavity? In still more bizarre non-logic, his and the other justices' decision rests on concerns about weapons and contraband in prison systems. But people under arrest – that is, who are not yet convicted – haven't been introduced into a prison population.
Our surveillance state shown considerable determination to intrude on citizens sexually. There's the sexual abuse of prisoners at Bagram – der Spiegel reports that "former inmates report incidents of … various forms of sexual humiliation. In some cases, an interrogator would place his penis along the face of the detainee while he was being questioned. Other inmates were raped with sticks or threatened with anal sex". There was the stripping of Bradley Manning is solitary confinement. And there's the policy set up after the story of the "underwear bomber" to grope US travelers genitally or else force them to go through a machine – made by a company, Rapiscan, owned by terror profiteer and former DHA czar Michael Chertoff – with images so vivid that it has been called the "pornoscanner".
Believe me: you don't want the state having the power to strip your clothes off. History shows that the use of forced nudity by a state that is descending into fascism is powerfully effective in controlling and subduing populations.
The political use of forced nudity by anti-democratic regimes is long established. Forcing people to undress is the first step in breaking down their sense of individuality and dignity and reinforcing their powerlessness. Enslaved women were sold naked on the blocks in the American south, and adolescent male slaves served young white ladies at table in the south, while they themselves were naked: their invisible humiliation was a trope for their emasculation. Jewish prisoners herded into concentration camps were stripped of clothing and photographed naked, as iconic images of that Holocaust reiterated.
One of the most terrifying moments for me when I visited Guantanamo prison in 2009 was seeing the way the architecture of the building positioned glass-fronted shower cubicles facing intentionally right into the central atrium – where young female guards stood watch over the forced nakedness of Muslim prisoners, who had no way to conceal themselves. Laws and rulings such as this are clearly designed to bring the conditions of Guantanamo, and abusive detention, home.
I have watched male police and TSA members standing by side by side salaciously observing women as they have been "patted down" in airports. I have experienced the weirdly phrased, sexually perverse intrusiveness of the state during an airport "pat-down", which is always phrased in the words of a steamy paperback ("do you have any sensitive areas? … I will use the back of my hands under your breasts …"). One of my Facebook commentators suggested, I think plausibly, that more women are about to be found liable for arrest for petty reasons (scarily enough, the TSA is advertising for more female officers).
I interviewed the equivalent of TSA workers in Britain and found that the genital groping that is obligatory in the US is illegal in Britain. I believe that the genital groping policy in America, too, is designed to psychologically habituate US citizens to a condition in which they are demeaned and sexually intruded upon by the state – at any moment.
The most terrifying phrase of all in the decision is justice Kennedy's striking use of the term "detainees" for "United States citizens under arrest". Some members of Occupy who were arrested in Los Angeles also reported having been referred to by police as such. Justice Kennedy's new use of what looks like a deliberate activation of that phrase is illuminating.
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Oh yeah, least we forget sometimes the police get the wrong person, oops!  Could be you, your innocent son, daughter, and/or significant other:

Thursday, April 5, 2012

Fox News, psychotically consistant

Maced students should be expelled.

Sunday, April 1, 2012

Riots in Lexington over UK win

Let's tone this down just a notch or two people.  No doubt criminal charges will be filed, and God forbid someone gets killed.  People were injured yesterday and people threw bottles at police.  This isn't the image we really want to project to the entire world about Lexington Kentucky.